Led Zeppelin “Celebration Day”

Led Zeppelin Celebration Day

Led Zeppelin will release the movie of their 2007 reunion show under the title Celebration Day on DVD and as a cinema feature.

The 2hr4min production will play in selected theatres across the world on October 17 following premieres in London, New York, Los Angeles and other major cities. Tickets for the public screenings will be available on September 13 via LedZeppelin.com.

Celebration Day will then go on sale in video and audio formats on November 19.

Over 20 million people applied for 18,000 tickets when Led Zeppelin announced they’d play London’s O2 Arena to celebrate the life of Atlantic Records boss Ahmet Ertegun.

Drummer John Bonham’s son Jason performed with Robert Plant, Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones, leading to plans for further shows together, which then ground to a halt when frontman Plant decided not to remain involved.

The Celebration Day announcement came after Led Zeppelin spent five days teasing fans with online countdown images and teaser sound clips.

Meanwhile, the band have been named as recipients of the 2012 Kennedy Center Honors. The organisation says the band “transformed the sound of rock and roll with their lyricism and innovative song structures, infusing blues into the sound of rock and roll and laying the foundation for countless rock bands.”

Celebration Day track list

01. Good Times, Bad Times
02. Ramble On
03. Black Dog
04. In My Time Of Dying
05. For Your Life
06. Trampled Underfoot
07. Nobody’s Fault But Mine
08. No Quarter
09. Since I’ve Been Lovin’ You
10. Dazed And Confused
11. Stairway To Heaven
12. The Song Remains the Same
13. Misty Mountain Hop
14. Kashmir
15. Whole Lotta Love
16. Rock And Roll

BONO (U2)

Born May 10th, 1960

I would describe Bono‘s singing as 50 percent Guinness, 10 percent cigarettes — and the rest is religion. He’s a physical singer, like the leader of a gospel choir, and he gets lost in the melodic moment. He goes to a place outside himself, especially in front of an audience, when he hits those high notes. That’s where his real power comes from — the pure, unadulterated Bono. He talks about things he believes in, whether it’s world economics or AIDS relief in Africa. But the voice always comes first. That’s where his conviction lies.

He has so many influences. You hear Joe Strummer, Bob Marley, Otis Redding, Elvis Presley, even John Lennon. And he has the same range as Robert Plant. It’s amazing, the notes he has to go through in the first lines of “Sunday Bloody Sunday.” But it’s filtered through this Irish choirboy. The Joshua Tree shows the mastery Bono has over his voice and what he learned from punk, New Wave and American musicians like Bob Dylan. In the quiet moments of “With or Without You,” you can imagine him sitting under the stars. Then, when he comes back to the chorus, all of a sudden it’s a hailstorm.

A lot of Bono’s free-form singing comes from the band’s rhythms and the church-bell feeling of the Edge’s playing, the way the guitar sings in that delay. Bono can glide vocally through all of that. But it’s very natural. And he’s not afraid to go beyond what he’s capable of, into something bizarre like his falsetto in “Lemon.” In “Kite,” on All That You Can’t Leave Behind, he belts it out like he’s crying with joy.

I never had the feeling he was manipulating the power of his voice to show off. They say a submarine never goes in reverse. That’s Bono, always looking for a new way of singing something. That’s one thing I learned from him: Never rest. Keep learning and be a good listener. That’s the spirit of singing — and he definitely has it.